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Contrasting places in Huck Finn

  In the novel "Huck Finn", by Mark Twain, there are two definite contrasting places. The land and the river both represent different things, and they both contribute to the meaning of the work.
  The book begins with Huck living in St. Petersburg with the Widow. This place was restrictive and binding. The house had rules and regulations which Huck followed without a choice. The Widow also taught him about the Catholic religion.
  St. Petersburg also represented Huck`s insane father. An obvious gold digger, Pap beat and taunted Huck whenever the opportunity presented itself. Both Huck and a servant, Jim, needed to escape this jail of a life. Huck wanted to leave because of Pap and the Widow`s attempts to civilize him. Jim, on the other hand, yearned for freedom and the idea of not being property.
  As soon as the duo escapes, they depart on the Mississippi River. The river, fast-moving and peaceful, carries Huck and Jim quickly away from their problems. Thus, Huck and Jim are willing to change their attitudes towards each other. Huck regards Jim as more of a human being rather than a slave. Although land surrounds the river, the places from which Huck and Jim want to escape, the river symbolizes a place where racial differences are put aside.
  After a short period of contentment on the river, Huck and Jim are constantly brought back to the prejudice and injustice of the land. Their contact with thieves and frauds show that no matter much time they spend on the quiet and relaxing river, society will keep coming back. When they miss the Ohio River due to the fog, Huck starts to realize the river is not the serene and melancholy place he thought it was.
  When the duke and dauphin come into the story, Huck and Jim spend more and more time on land (the society they did not want to be a part of). Instead of searching for freedom and happiness, Huck and Jim are stranded i... Also you can read about it on my blog - http://raylaandsaxon.edublogs.org/2019/04/03/the-righteousness-in-huck/.

Letter from Birmingham Jail

Illusions are used in this letter frequently, not only to establish a position, but also to create some emotional appeal for its readers. Martin Luther King Jr. used these allusions strategically, to hopefully convey his message to the eight Alabama clergymen who doubted him and his efforts. Using references to God and the bible are always powerful, for they relate to a well-known and widely accepted, yet highly criticized subject. Religion is a touchy subject, for so many people have their strong, modified beliefs toward it. In King`s letter, it`s clear to the reader just how strongly he feels in his beliefs, and how he`s using that to his advantage.
Being president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference automatically gave King the image of a respectable man in the leadership of the Christian faith. His reference to the fact that ""prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their villages and carried their`thus saith the Lord` far beyond the boundaries of their home towns,"" (262) shows just how extensive his religious knowledge is. Adding to this knowledge would be the mention of the Greek philosopher Socrates, and how he ""felt that it was necessary to create a tension in the mind so that individuals could rise from the bondage of myths and half-truths to the unfettered realm of creative analysis and objective appraisal.""(263-264). King is clearly a brilliant man. These statements clearly show that he has spent much time in the research and study of religious facts. Ethos is appealed to by King`s establishment of his position as a knowledgeable, religious, leadership figure.
Emotions are stirred up well in this letter, with powerful words. ""It was practiced superbly by the early Christians, who were willing to face hungry lions and the excruciating pain of chopping blocks rather than submit to certain unjust laws of the Roman Empire"" (266). King`s use of ph... "

 

The Odyssey

"Foreshadowing · Agamemnon’s fate at the hands of his wife and his vindication by his son foreshadow the domestic troubles and triumphs Odysseus faces when he returns to Ithaca; Odysseus is nearly recognized by his wife and servants several times in Books 18–19, foreshadowing the revelation of his identity in Book 22." 

"The majority of the Odyssey is an account of Odysseus' adventures trying to reach his homeland of Ithaka. Several of these adventures are false homecomings, the most prominent of which is his imprisonment on Kalypso's island. This false homecoming is strikingly different from what one would expect of Odysseus' real homecoming, but similar enough for parallels to be drawn between the two. Homer uses this false homecoming to foreshadow Odysseus' true homecoming." 

"If the Greeks survive these terrors, they will meet the most dangerous test of all: the temptation of the island (Thrinacia) of the Sungod Helios. Whatever they do, the seamen must not harm the sacred cattle of the sun. If they resist temptation, they can return home safely; if, on the other hand, they harm any sacred animal, the ship and men will be destroyed. Odysseus alone may survive, but he will return home late and alone, a broken man. This last caveat (12.148–53) echoes the curse of the Cyclops (9.590–95) and the prophecy of Tiresias (11.125–35). Circe’s warnings prove to be a foreshadowing of the true events." 

"Menelaus’ queen is the same Helen whose abduction from Sparta caused the Trojan War. Foreshadowing Odysseus’ disguise when he returns to Ithaca, Helen recalls how he scarred his body and donned slave’s clothing in order to slip into Troy under the guise of a beggar. Still with the Trojans at that time, she alone suspected that the beggar was a spy; but she protected his secret until he was safely gone. Menelaus recalls the crafty Odysseus’ legendary ruse of the Trojan horse that led to the defeat of Troy." 

Setting 
The setting of Book XXI is Odysseus’s house and The Odyssey essay thesis

Foreshadowing--Line 5 
“To usher bloody slaughter in” is a foreshadowing of the battle to come, although in context it is only an expression used in Penelope’s thoughts. 

Foreshadowing--Lines 108-110 
This is a foreshadowing of the battle: Antinoos will be the first to die."

A Look at Non-Fiction Texts

Non-fiction texts are texts that are true and not, in the simple sense, fictitious. Non-fiction texts record things that actually happened. However, while non-fiction texts may aim to be objective and factual, the truth of a person`s life can be colored and distorted by the purposes and perspectives of the author. The subjective experience of people involved in the circumstances and events being re-told and reconstructed. 


In the book, "Anna`s Story", 1 year old Anna Wood, living in Sydney`s northern suburbs and attending Forest High School, did in fact die tragically on 24 October 195, three days after taking an ecstasy tablet at a rave party. However, while the reader is presented with honest and deeply-felt accounts from the principal people involved in Anna`s shocking loss of life, Bronwyn Donaghy conveys these`facts` through narrative perspectives, emotive language and rhetorical devices which means that the story of Anna`s life is not told from a detached and objective standpoint. As a result, Anna`s Story, does not reach a lot of conclusions, but leaves many questions unanswered inviting readers to form their own views and opinions about how events happened, who was to blame and how Anna`s life may have been saved had people acted differently.


The statement that`non-fiction texts are not always objective` can be seen in the chapter headings of Anna`s Story. Varied perspectives of Anna`s life are told through the twenty-seven chapters of the book, which include thirteen very personal accounts from Anna`s family and friends, in addition to a foreword by a doctor, a message from Kate Ceberano, the author`s note, the prologue, an epilogue and a recommended reading list. "Anna`s Story" contains many voices which makes the story more subjective. Adding to this, the twenty-seven chapters of Anna`s Story are grouped in two parts.

 

Best Quotes in To Kill Mockingbird

There are two quotes from Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" that meet your criteria. One appears in Chapter 3, and one appears in Chapter 31. 

Caveat: As to providing page numbers, the edition of the book in my library is the Warner Books paperback edition published in 1988. I do not know which of the hundreds of editions and printings of the novel that you are using; however, it is unlikely that it is the same edition and printing from which I have taken the quotes below. Thus, I caution you about using the page numbers that I have provided. To assist you, I have provided you with the page numbers from the edition that I am using; the chapter numbers; and the approximate place in the chapter where the respective quotes are found. This should make it much easier for you to find the quotes in the edition and printing that you are using. 

Answer: 

___CHAPTER 3, (Page 30: Within the final few pages of Chapter 3) -- Scout has come home from a trying day at school. She does not want to return to school the next day; however, Atticus suggests instead that Scout follow an axiom that he believe will help her in school and in life. 

__[Atticus] "First of all,' he said, 'if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.'" 


___CHAPTER 31, (Page 283: Within the final few pages of the book) -- A more mature Scout has walked Arthur "Boo" Radley from her house to his front porch. After he closes the door behind him, Scout, as narrator, thinks about "Boo," her neighborhood, and the wise advice that Atticus had shared with her earlier in the novel. 

__[Scout as narrator] "Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough." 

 Sourseshttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2657.To_Kill_a_Mockingbird

Whig

The Democratic and Whig parties conceived individualism to be very different.The Democrats were still torn between what they felt and what society felt, where as the Whigs were very secure in their internal feelings."The Whigs were comfortable with rational, self-interested human relations (Kohl 63).Most Jacksonians (Democrats) found that they could adapt their behaviors more easily than their feelings (Kohl 21). The Jacksonian Democrats way of thinking was vastly different than the thinking of the Whigs. While, as an individual, he (JD) still relied heavily on the secure relations of a personal world, his society increasingly bestowed its benefits on those who were more comfortable with an ethic of individualism (Kohl 21).Democrats were often induced to take up the new ways, but the political policies they enacted and the language they used to describe them reveal an anxiety born of inner conflict (Kohl 21).

Many Jacksonians felt that the world was treating them unfairly (Kohl 21).The standard form of Jacksonian rhetoric was accusatory (Kohl 21).It was critical, unhappy with the world, looking for an evil to attack, always pointing to a malefactor (Kohl 21).The Jacksonians belief was not just the cry poor people; rather most Jacksonians were men of wealth and position. The Jacksonian was prone to the belief that he was always investing more in the world than he was deriving form it (Kohl 21-22). If he progressed, it was despite obstacles which had been thrown in his way (Kohl 22).""If he did well he should have done better (Kohl 22). Some reward was always withheld from him (Kohl 22).

Any progress he made was individual and solitary; associations and institutions tended to retard, not facilitate his purposes (Kohl 22). The Democratic and Whig parties conceived individualism to be very different.The Democrats were still torn between what they felt and what society felt, where as the Whigs were very secure in their internal feelings."The Whigs were comfortable with rational, self-interested human relations (Kohl 63).""Most Jacksonians (Democrats) found that they could adapt their behaviors more easily than their feelings (Kohl 21)."

The Jacksonian Democrats way of thinking was vastly different than the thinking of the Whigs."While, as an individual, he (JD) still relied heavily on the secure relations of a personal world, his society increasingly bestowed its benefits on those who were more comfortable with an ethic of individualism (Kohl 21).""Democrats were often induced to take up the new ways, but the political policies they enacted and the language they used to describe them reveal an anxiety born of inner conflict (Kohl 21)."

Many Jacksonians felt that the world was treating them unfairly (Kohl 21)."The standard form of Jacksonian rhetoric was accusatory (Kohl 21).""It was critical, unhappy with the world, looking for an evil to attack, always pointing to a malefactor (Kohl 21)."The Jacksonians belief was not just the cry from poor people; rather most Jacksonians were men of wealth and position.

"The Jacksonian was prone to the belief that he was always investing more in the world than he was deriving form it (Kohl 21-22)""If he progressed, it was despite obstacles which had been thrown in his way (Kohl 22).""If he did well he should have done better (Kohl 22).""Some reward was always withheld from him (Kohl 22).""Any progress he made was individual and solitary; associations and institutions tended to retard, not facilitate his purposes (Kohl 22)."

Sources:   https://thepoetrytrust.org/

                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Party_(United_States)

              

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